Wednesday, August 12, 2009

The Right's "limited racial imagination"?

Yglesias calls out the Right's limited and cynical view of racism in the US, and I think, in doing so has been too kind.

Cato's Ilya Shapairo writes that Judge Sotomayor's nomination to the Supreme Court "represents the very worst of racial politics,..."

Matt thinks Shapairo's view may be a little shallow,
....the idea that picking one appellate judge rather than another for a promotion could possibly be the very worst of racial politics is ludicrous. At its very worst, racial politics in the United States involved the systematic disenfranchisement of millions of people, their subjection to pervasive social and economic discrimination, and the maintenance of the apartheid system via the threat and reality of state-sponsored terrorist violence. At its very worst, racial politics in the United States involved persistent filibustering to prevent the federal government from doing anything to curb widespread lynching. At its very worst, racial politics in the United States involved a violent rebellion that sought to dismantle the country in the name of chattel slavery and led to the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people.

But despite that long history, broad swathes of the American right remain persistently and willfully blind to the problem of discrimination against non-whites. Their view is, essentially, that racism emerged as a problem sometime in the year 1967 and that the problem consists of white people being unduly burdened by efforts to remediate something or other.
Matt's being polite. The Right's problem with race is that they remain dominated by racists.

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